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20 May 2017

Conceptual Physics Tournament Sunday May 21 2017

[The following is a letter to my school's community describing our project-in-lieu-of-exam that will happen tomorrow.  If any blog reader is interested in creating something similar at her or his school, please let me know.  I'd love to help out!]

Folks, tomorrow is the first ever WFS Conceptual Physics Tournament.  

Instead of preparing for an exam, our students have been preparing to present and discuss the solutions to some rather deep problems, which are attached to this email.  Mentors from the AP Physics classes have helped the 3rd formers conduct experiments, to understand the underlying theory, and to deliver a two-minute talk.

Tomorrow, each student will be assigned to report in two "physics fights."  Think of the physics fight as a thesis defense.  The reporter presents his/her two-minute talk; and then the examiners engage in conversation with the reporter for five more minutes.  The examiners are probing how deeply the students truly understand the problem, and how clearly the students can articulate their understanding.

Physics fighting is a spectator sport.  We encourage all members of the community (including parents of 3rd formers!) to come out to watch a few physics fights.  These will take place in Manning and Kenan.  We will run approximately eight rounds, beginning at 1:00 and ending around 3:00.  The specific fight schedule will be posted in the dining hall and to the news folder around 12:30 Sunday.

Alex Tisch and Colin Manning have done tremendous work preparing their students, not just in the past couple of weeks, but all year.  The mentors have taken to their task with relish.  The 3rd formers have worked very hard, and are ready to demonstrate their knowledge.  Come see the fruits of their labor.  

GCJ

11:30: Examiner arrival, lunch in Terry Dining Room
12:00: Examiner training in Terry Dining Room
12:30: Posting of fight card
12:50: Examiners and students move to fight rooms

1:00: Round 1
1:12: Round 2
1:24: Round 3
1:36: Round 4

1:48: Break; examiners switch partners

2:00: Round 5
2:12: Round 6
2:24: Round 7
2:36: Round 8

19 May 2017

AP Summer Institute: June 26-29, Mahopac, NY

Folks, a quick bit of advertising here... we're still looking for a few teachers to fill up my AP Summer Institute in Mahopac, NY from June 26-29.

At this and all of my summer institutes, I'll take you through all aspects of my AP Physics 1 classes.  We'll do some of the different kinds of experiments I've discussed on this blog.  We'll share ideas with each other - I leave every institute with new ideas to try out.  And I can discuss physics teaching beyond AP Physics 1, including conceptual physics as well as AP Physics 2 or C.

For those looking to meet various certification requirements, this particular institute allows you to earn graduate credit.

Please contact Mark Langella, the institute director and a pretty dang impressive AP chemistry teacher, for signup details.  You can contact him via the Putnam-Westchester Industry and Science Teacher Alliance.  

I hope to see you in New York...

GCJ

04 May 2017

2017 AP Physics 1 solutions

I enjoyed writing my solutions to the 2017 AP Physics 1 free response questions.  You can find the questions linked via the official College Board exam site, here.

I very much like the direction the "quantitative-qualitative translation" question has gone.  Twice, students were given an equation, and asked why it does or does not make physical sense.  That's such a great skill to develop, and to test.  And I loved the experimental question... the experiment itself was quite straightforward.  But the "based on this data, how do you feel about this conclusion?" question was amazing.  It gets at the heart of evaluating quantitative evidence, at basic numeracy.  If every journalist and politician in America could answer this question accurately, the world would be a better place.

Okay, now I'm going to link the solutions.  But, please note that due to College Board copyright rules, only teachers can access them.  The PGP-secure website requires verification that you are a teacher in order to sign up.  

One of my favorite people, Gardner Friedlander, runs this teachers-only wiki.  He became quite frustrated last year because so many students asked for access -- many pretended to be teachers. Folks, Gardner isn't stupid.  He verifies that you're a teacher.  Please don't make him come after you for impersonating a teacher -- he will take away your birthday.

So, students, do you want access?  Ask your teacher to join PGP-secure.  Your teacher may share the solutions "for face-to-face teaching purposes."  

As always, I guarantee that I've earned a 5, but not that I get every detail right.  Please note my mistakes in the comment section.

My solutions can be found via this link, at PGP-secure.  This is a wiki for physics teachers only.  If you are a teacher but don't have access yet, follow the instructions at the linked page; you should be approved in a few days. 

GCJ

01 May 2017

How long should my answers be on the AP Physics 1 exam?

Quick answer: probably shorter than you think.

Below are a variety of AP Physics 1 prompts, and how I would suggest structuring your answer.  Please note that, while I do grade the exams every year, I am writing here in the role of independent observer.  I am not a representative of the College Board.  These are my own simplified instructions to my own students, which may not be perfect in all situations.

Yet I think teaching is much better done by simple guidelines rather than legalisms.  If you want the legalisms, go to the College Board's course and exam description; and look at the AP Central page where they go in to great detail about the requirements for a paragraph response.  I don't think a student wants to see such detail.  I think, in fact, that we should actively discourage students from a rules-bound approach to any answers.  Encourage your students to simply answer each question, and move on.

On my last day of class before the exam, I will remind students of the types of prompts below, and my guidelines for the length of the response required.  And then I will let go, and wish them the best.


"Briefly Explain:" or "Briefly justify"  Answer in one sentence.

"Derive an expression:"  Use variables only, start with an equation from the equation sheet or a fundamental principle.  It will help to annotate your work with words, but complete sentences are not necessary.  Full credit can usually be earned without words at all as long as the mathematics is communicated clearly. 

"Describe a procedure:"  Two to three sentences, never more.  Say what you will measure, and what equipment you'll use to measure it.  And stop writing.

"Explain" or "Justify your answer:" About two sentences, or perhaps one sentence with reference to an equation.

"Answer in a clear, coherent, paragraph-length response:"  Five sentences, four is often enough.  Do not repeat the question in the answer. Get to the point.

For all responses except mathematical derivations:  Use sentences with subjects and verbs, but without fluff.  

What if I need more space than the question provides?  Then you are writing too much.  The amount of space provided is deliberate, and reflects the length of response expected.  Yes, I know you are allowed to use scratch paper and staple it into the book.  You're also allowed to publish your bank account information online.  Just don't.  

Don't fear for the lost point.  Students tend to write page-long essays because they fear that the grader will "take off" if they miss one small detail.  But those students miss the bigger picture.  Running out of time on question 5 could cost them seven points, while writing an extra page may in their imaginations earn one point.  And writing that extra page is far more likely to lose credit for an incorrect statement than to gain credit.  

Please don't be afraid.  Answer each question briefly and confidently.  If you have to guess, guess briefly.  Believe it or not, we readers know when you're just writing random crap because you have no idea how to approach a problem.  And rubrics are written such that they are unlikely to award credit for baloney.

Kick arse tomorrow.  Let me know how it goes.  I'll post my solutions when I can.

GCJ